The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Benjamin Franklin
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Benjamin Franklin

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

yuliayuliadwi
yuliayuliadwisitat gətirir4 il öncə
it was extremely agreeable to hear
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir2 gün öncə
Hu­man fe­li­city is pro­duced not so much by great pieces of good for­tune that sel­dom hap­pen, as by little ad­vant­ages that oc­cur every day. Thus, if you teach a poor young man to shave him­self, and keep his razor in or­der, you may con­trib­ute more to the hap­pi­ness of his life than in giv­ing him a thou­sand guineas. The money may be soon spent, the re­gret only re­main­ing of hav­ing fool­ishly con­sumed it; but in the other case, he es­capes the fre­quent vex­a­tion of wait­ing for barbers, and of their some­times dirty fin­gers, of­fens­ive breaths, and dull razors; he shaves when most con­veni­ent to him, and en­joys daily the pleas­ure of its be­ing done with a good in­stru­ment.
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 gün öncə
The Great Spirit, who made all things, made everything for some use, and whatever use he de­signed any­thing for, that use it should al­ways be put to. Now, when he made rum, he said, ‘Let this be for the In­di­ans to get drunk with,’ and it must be so
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir4 gün öncə
That, as we en­joy great ad­vant­ages from the in­ven­tions of oth­ers, we should be glad of an op­por­tun­ity to serve oth­ers by any in­ven­tion of ours; and this we should do freely and gen­er­ously
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir4 gün öncə
like a man trav­el­ing in foggy weather, those at some dis­tance be­fore him on the road he sees wrapped up in the fog, as well as those be­hind him, and also the people in the fields on each side, but near him all ap­pears clear, though in truth he is as much in the fog as any of them.
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir4 gün öncə
Part­ner­ships of­ten fin­ish in quar­rels; but I was happy in this, that mine were all car­ried on and ended am­ic­ably, ow­ing, I think, a good deal to the pre­cau­tion of hav­ing very ex­pli­citly settled, in our art­icles, everything to be done by or ex­pec­ted from each part­ner, so that there was noth­ing to dis­pute, which pre­cau­tion I would there­fore re­com­mend to all who enter into part­ner­ships; for, whatever es­teem part­ners may have for, and con­fid­ence in each other at the time of the con­tract, little jeal­ousies and dis­gusts may arise, with ideas of in­equal­ity in the care and bur­den of the busi­ness, etc., which are at­ten­ded of­ten with breach of friend­ship and of the con­nec­tion, per­haps with law­suits and other dis­agree­able con­sequences.
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir17 gün öncə
I can­not boast of much suc­cess in ac­quir­ing the real­ity of this vir­tue, but I had a good deal with re­gard to the ap­pear­ance of it. I made it a rule to for­bear all dir­ect con­tra­dic­tion to the sen­ti­ments of oth­ers, and all pos­it­ive as­ser­tion of my own. I even for­bid my­self, agree­ably to the old laws of our Junto, the use of every word or ex­pres­sion in the lan­guage that im­por­ted a fixed opin­ion, such as “cer­tainly,” “un­doubtedly,” etc., and I ad­op­ted, in­stead of them, “I con­ceive,” “I ap­pre­hend,” or “I ima­gine” a thing to be so or so; or it “so ap­pears to me at present.” When an­other as­ser­ted some­thing that I thought an er­ror, I denied my­self the pleas­ure of con­tra­dict­ing him ab­ruptly, and of show­ing im­me­di­ately some ab­surdity in his pro­pos­i­tion; and in an­swer­ing I began by ob­serving that in cer­tain cases or cir­cum­stances his opin­ion would be right, but in the present case there ap­peared or seemed to me some dif­fer­ence, etc. I soon found the ad­vant­age of this change in my man­ner; the con­ver­sa­tions I en­gaged in went on more pleas­antly. The mod­est way in which I pro­posed my opin­ions pro­cured them a read­ier re­cep­tion and less con­tra­dic­tion; I had less mor­ti­fic­a­tion when I was found to be in the wrong, and I more eas­ily pre­vailed with oth­ers to give up their mis­takes and join with me when I happened to be in the right
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir17 gün öncə
This art­icle, there­fore, cost me so much pain­ful at­ten­tion, and my faults in it vexed me so much, and I made so little pro­gress in amend­ment, and had such fre­quent re­lapses, that I was al­most ready to give up the at­tempt, and con­tent my­self with a faulty char­ac­ter in that re­spect, like the man who, in buy­ing an ax of a smith, my neigh­bour, de­sired to have the whole of its sur­face as bright as the edge. The smith con­sen­ted to grind it bright for him if he would turn the wheel; he turned, while the smith pressed the broad face of the ax hard and heav­ily on the stone, which made the turn­ing of it very fa­tiguing. The man came every now and then from the wheel to see how the work went on, and at length would take his ax as it was, without farther grind­ing. “No,” said the smith, “turn on, turn on; we shall have it bright by-and-by; as yet, it is only speckled.” “Yes,” says the man, “but I think I like a speckled ax best.” And I be­lieve this may have been the case with many, who, hav­ing, for want of some such means as I em­ployed, found the dif­fi­culty of ob­tain­ing good and break­ing bad habits in other points of vice and vir­tue, have given up the struggle, and con­cluded that “a speckled ax was best”; for some­thing, that pre­ten­ded to be reason, was every now and then sug­gest­ing to me that such ex­treme nicety as I ex­ac­ted of my­self might be a kind of fop­pery in mor­als, which, if it were known, would make me ri­dicu­lous; that a per­fect char­ac­ter might be at­ten­ded with the in­con­veni­ence of be­ing en­vied and hated; and that a be­ne­vol­ent man should al­low a few faults in him­self, to keep his friends in coun­ten­ance.
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
And like him who, hav­ing a garden to weed, does not at­tempt to erad­ic­ate all the bad herbs at once, which would ex­ceed his reach and his strength, but works on one of the beds at a time, and, hav­ing ac­com­plished the first, pro­ceeds to a second, so I should have, I hoped, the en­cour­aging pleas­ure of see­ing on my pages the pro­gress I made in vir­tue, by clear­ing suc­cess­ively my lines of their spots, till in the end, by a num­ber of courses, I should be happy in view­ing a clean book, after a thir­teen weeks’ daily ex­am­in­a­tion
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
These names of vir­tues, with their pre­cepts, were:
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
He that would thrive, must ask his wife
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
The ob­jec­tions and re­luct­ances I met with in so­li­cit­ing the sub­scrip­tions, made me soon feel the im­pro­pri­ety of present­ing one’s self as the pro­poser of any use­ful pro­ject, that might be sup­posed to raise one’s repu­ta­tion in the smal­lest de­gree above that of one’s neigh­bours, when one has need of their as­sist­ance to ac­com­plish that pro­ject. I there­fore put my­self as much as I could out of sight, and stated it as a scheme of a num­ber of friends, who had re­ques­ted me to go about and pro­pose it to such as they thought lov­ers of read­ing. In this way my af­fair went on more smoothly, and I ever after prac­tised it on such oc­ca­sions; and, from my fre­quent suc­cesses, can heart­ily re­com­mend it
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
Our de­bates pos­sessed me so fully of the sub­ject, that I wrote and prin­ted an an­onym­ous pamph­let on it, en­titled “The Nature and Ne­ces­sity of a Paper Cur­rency.” It was well re­ceived by the com­mon people in gen­eral; but the rich men dis­liked it, for it in­creased and strengthened the clamor for more money, and they hap­pen­ing to have no writers among them that were able to an­swer it, their op­pos­i­tion slackened, and the point was car­ried by a ma­jor­ity in the House. My friends there, who con­ceived I had been of some ser­vice, thought fit to re­ward me by em­ploy­ing me in print­ing the money; a very prof­it­able job and a great help to me. This was an­other ad­vant­age gained by my be­ing able to write
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
And this per­sua­sion, with the kind hand of Provid­ence, or some guard­ian an­gel, or ac­ci­dental fa­vour­able cir­cum­stances and situ­ations, or all to­gether, pre­served me, through this dan­ger­ous time of youth, and the haz­ard­ous situ­ations I was some­times in among strangers, re­mote from the eye and ad­vice of my father, without any will­ful gross im­mor­al­ity or in­justice, that might have been ex­pec­ted from my want of re­li­gion. I say will­ful, be­cause the in­stances I have men­tioned had some­thing of ne­ces­sity in them, from my youth, in­ex­per­i­ence, and the knavery of oth­ers. I had there­fore a tol­er­able char­ac­ter to be­gin the world with; I val­ued it prop­erly, and de­term­ined to pre­serve it
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
“Whatever is, is right. Though pur­blind man
Sees but a part o’ the chain, the nearest link:
His eyes not car­ry­ing to the equal beam,
That poises all above;”

and from the at­trib­utes of God, his in­fin­ite wis­dom, good­ness and power, con­cluded that noth­ing could pos­sibly be wrong in the world, and that vice and vir­tue were empty dis­tinc­tions, no such things ex­ist­ing, ap­peared now not so clever a per­form­ance as I once thought it; and I doubted whether some er­ror had not in­sinu­ated it­self un­per­ceived into my ar­gu­ment, so as to in­fect all that fol­lowed, as is com­mon in meta­phys­ical reas­on­ings
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
My mind hav­ing been much more im­proved by read­ing than Keimer’s, I sup­pose it was for that reason my con­ver­sa­tion seemed to be more val­ued. They had me to their houses, in­tro­duced me to their friends, and showed me much ci­vil­ity; while he, though the mas­ter, was a little neg­lected. In truth, he was an odd fish; ig­nor­ant of com­mon life, fond of rudely op­pos­ing re­ceived opin­ions, slov­enly to ex­treme dirti­ness, en­thu­si­astic in some points of re­li­gion, and a little knav­ish withal
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
I en­deav­oured to con­vince him that the bod­ily strength af­forded by beer could only be in pro­por­tion to the grain or flour of the bar­ley dis­solved in the wa­ter of which it was made; that there was more flour in a penny­worth of bread; and there­fore, if he would eat that with a pint of wa­ter, it would give him more strength than a quart of beer. He drank on, how­ever, and had four or five shil­lings to pay out of his wages every Saturday night for that mud­dling li­quor; an ex­pense I was free from. And thus these poor dev­ils keep them­selves al­ways un­der.
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
So con­veni­ent a thing is it to be a reas­on­able creature, since it en­ables one to find or make a reason for everything one has a mind to do
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
when the fish were opened, I saw smal­ler fish taken out of their stom­achs; then thought I, “If you eat one an­other, I don’t see why we mayn’t eat you.”
Sulav Govinda Shrestha
Sulav Govinda Shresthasitat gətirir3 ay öncə
We ar­rived safe, how­ever, at Bo­ston in about a fort­night. I had been ab­sent seven months, and my friends had heard noth­ing of me; for my brother Holmes was not yet re­turned, and had not writ­ten about me. My un­ex­pec­ted ap­pear­ance sur­prised the fam­ily; all were, how­ever, very glad to see me, and made me wel­come, ex­cept my brother. I went to see him at his print­ing-house. I was bet­ter dressed than ever while in his ser­vice, hav­ing a gen­teel new suit from head to foot, a watch, and my pock­ets lined with near five pounds ster­ling in sil­ver. He re­ceived me not very frankly, looked me all over, and turned to his work again.
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